Webinar on Testicular and Penile Cancer

The increase in Urologists and centres dedicated to oncology in India in the last decade has been a welcome change. While this is already translating into better clinical and operative management of patients with Urological cancers, it can be further extended to meaningful research eventually contributing to better patient outcome. Globally Penile and Testicular cancer are classified as rare genitourinary cancers. India has a relatively higher incidence of penile cancer compared to that in many other developed nations. Rare cancers suffer from lack of strong evidence in various aspects of its management. One way of generating evidence is to conduct multi institutional studies or collaborative studies. If Indian centres routinely managing these cancers join hands, we would be able to fill the evidence gaps that are glaring at us.

This webinar is an attempt to highlight the missing links in understanding of penile and testicular cancers. Further, USI intends to discuss its vision and the pathways and challenges in conducting national and international collaborative studies which could be very relevant to these cancers. We are fortunate to have the company of three distinguished International faculties with immense experience in translational and clinical research and collaborative studies related to these two cancers.  The increase in Urologists and centres dedicated to oncology in India in the last decade has been a welcome change. While this is already translating into better clinical and operative management of patients with Urological cancers, it can be further extended to meaningful research eventually contributing to better patient outcome. Globally Penile and Testicular cancer are classified as rare genitourinary cancers. India has a relatively higher incidence of penile cancer compared to that in many other developed nations. Rare cancers suffer from lack of strong evidence in various aspects of its management. One way of generating evidence is to conduct multi institutional studies or collaborative studies. If Indian centres routinely managing these cancers join hands, we would be able to fill the evidence gaps that are glaring at us.

This webinar is an attempt to highlight the missing links in understanding of penile and testicular cancers. Further, USI intends to discuss its vision and the pathways and challenges in conducting national and international collaborative studies which could be very relevant to these cancers. We are fortunate to have the company of three distinguished International faculties with immense experience in translational and clinical research and collaborative studies related to these two cancers.